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author

Quentin Baker
Charles Oswald
Adrian Pierorazio

published on

August 2002

This paper describes the analysis methodologies that are used in the ERASDAC (Explosion Risk and Structural Damage Assessment Code) computer program. As the name implies, ERASDAC was developed to evaluate explosion consequences and risk assessments in and around DoD facilities. The software was designed to handle facility-wide assessments, with all explosion hazards and acceptor buildings being entered into a facility database. ERASDAC can analyze any combination of explosion hazards and acceptors. Standard libraries of explosives, munitions, and structures are included, and user defined items can be added.

At the heart of the risk model is the building occupant vulnerability model that is used to determine the percentage of building occupants with serious, life-threatening injuries based on the overall building blast damage level. Inputs to the model include information on the structural blast damage to the building, the building construction type, and the percentage of occupants in interior and perimeter spaces of the building. The vulnerability model has a flexible structure with variables that are currently defined using the best available existing data. These variables can easily be updated in the future as more data becomes available. The vulnerability model is based on injury information from the Oklahoma City bombing and limited data from earthquake casualties. Where data is lacing, the model is based on engineering judgment. This judgment includes experience gained by Baker Engineering and Risk Consultants, Inc. (BakerRisk) during investigations of explosion accidents that have caused a broad range of damage and injuries for different types of conventional buildings.

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Quentin Baker

Charles Oswald

Adrian Pierorazio